How-To Guide For ReliefBand 1.5

by ReliefBand | September 12, 2017

After years of nausea, and probably more than a little retching and vomiting, you’ve ordered your very first Reliefband®. Congratulations!

Now, let’s talk about the nuts and bolts of how to use Reliefband® to get maximum effectiveness for you.

Positioning Reliefband® properly on your wrist is essential for relief of your nausea, retching, and vomiting symptoms. Before you start using Reliefband®, please read the Instructions for Use carefully. You must feel stimulation in your palm and/or middle fingers for Reliefband® to work.

There’s a specific spot on the underside of your wrist where ReliefBand® needs to be positioned.



Find the starting area on the wrist. Using either wrist, the correct area is between the two tendons on the underside of the wrist – two finger-widths above the wrist crease farthest from your elbow.



Before positioning your Reliefband®, clean the area first. Once the area is clean, apply a small drop of gel and spread it in a circle about the size of a large coin with an even sheen (i.e., a thin layer with a shiny appearance).



Place the device over the gelled area and attach it to the wrist. Fasten the device snugly. Press the power button in the center of the device to turn it on. Starting at power level 1, increase stimulation until tingling is felt through median nerve in palm and middle finger at a comfortable level. Press the power button in the center of the device for 3 seconds to turn it off.

When to use Reliefband®?

You can use your Reliefband® either before or after your nausea, retching, and vomiting symptoms start and leave it on for as long as your symptoms last.

If you are highly susceptible to motion sickness, apply Reliefband® one half hour before a motion sickness event (e.g., riding in a car, airplane, or boat).

How can you be sure you’ve found the area for maximum stimulation?

After the device is turned on, move it slightly up or down, and side to side on the wrist until the maximum “tingling” feeling is felt. You will feel a tingling sensation in your palm and/or middle fingers when Reliefband® is in the proper wrist location.

Stimulation will cycle every four seconds. If little or no tingling is felt after moving it around, increase the power level to the next level of stimulation. This device has five levels of stimulation: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 (level 5 is the highest setting).

On which wrist should you wear Reliefband®?

On the wrist that gives you the greatest tingling in the hand at the lowest stimulation level.

Is dry or sensitive skin a problem?

For dry skin, the gel may be lightly applied more often. If you have especially sensitive skin, switch wrists every 2-3 hours. Be sure to re-apply gel as directed.

And that’s it! Please read your Instructions For Use, and let us know if you have any questions.

Now go, and live your life in full motion!

 

Don’t Let Road Trips Throw You A Curve

Road trips are escapes from the routine at the speed of life.

Americans and cars go together like apple pie and ice cream. We enjoy our cars, especially for road trips!

Many of us don’t typically experience carsickness, but you throw in enough curves and hills as we motor toward the end of a day’s driving, and some of us will feel queasy.

The fact is, any of us may experience carsickness under the right (or wrong) circumstances.

There are a few things you can do to try and get to the end of your driving day puke-free. Most importantly before you hit the road make sure you have a Reliefband for everyone in the car.

Take frequent driving breaks to get everyone out of the car and check out the scenery.

Keep a stream of cool air blowing in the face of each person while the car is in motion.

Don’t consume greasy or heavy food, and keep the smelly food for another time.

Eat light snacks while in the car.

Stay hydrated with non-sugary liquids – plain water is perfect.

Keep your eyes focused on the horizon (not at scenery zipping past the side of the car).

Be aware that it’s possible for anyone to get carsick, or even all your passengers. Be prepared, have fun out there and live life in full motion with Reliefband!

Bye Mom, Hello Uni!

It’s that time of year when we help our grown children pack up and leave the family home. University for them, now-idle bedroom converted to a hobby room for us.

Life is good.

So, what’s on the packing list? There is a packing list, right? If not, you will be shipping multiple packages for months, full of forgotten boots, tennis rackets, special shampoos, or favorite jammies.

Bedding. Take a look at your child’s bed and add everything you see to the list. Pillows, sheets, blankets, throw pillows, possibly stuffed animals will all make the list. Plus, an anti-bedbug mattress cover and some sort of feather or foam mattress topper to provide cushioning for what is sure to be a hard mattress.

Room stuff. If you know how big the room is and what’s already in it, this part should be easy. Things to consider: seating (chair, beanbag, futon, whatever), lamps, desk, rugs, small table(s), trashcans, storage bins for under the bed and bed risers to make more room for the bins, hangers and storage bins for the closet, large mirror, curtains and rods, wall décor, fridge, fan. Well, that’s a start.

Bathroom items. This is the tough one because you’ll need to go into your child’s bathroom in order to fill out the list. Take your child with you — no sense in suffering alone. Starting from one corner of the room, inspect every inch of the space, making your way completely around the room while noting items for the list. Don’t forget essential but non-personal objects such as toilet paper and cotton balls.

Medical/Legal necessities. Note all prescription and over-the-counter medicines your child takes, even those taken only occasionally. Plus, list any documents that will need to be in the possession of your grown child. Note: it’s critical that you make copies of all documents you send with your child. When possible, send the copy and keep the original. Think passport, health/car/renters insurance, birth certificate, social security, bank accounts, really all the documents you’ve kept safely filed away, you’ll now have to entrust to your grown child.

Odds and ends. There are helpful lists on the internet that mention hundreds of necessary and unnecessary items your child may need to pack for university. It’s a good idea to browse those lists and compare yours for missing items. Some overlooked things we find useful for grown children packing for university are earplugs, duct tape, umbrella, flashlight, deck of cards, small toolkit, and a sleep mask.

And finally, help them live life in full motion. Slip a Reliefband® on your young adult’s wrist and explain how to use it. It’s drug-free wearable tech that treats the nausea, retching, and vomiting associated with VR-related motion sickness. He or she will be prepared for the next epic all-day battle in Raw Data or Chronos, right after he/she aces the tests for the week.

If they are wearing a Reliefband®, they won’t need mom or dad there to treat the nasty symptoms of motion sickness caused by VR, or those caused by riding in cars/planes/boats.

That’s a good thing . . . right? Sniff.

Gone Fishing

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Fishing. It’s simple for some people. Hop in a boat and head toward open water.


It’s not so simple for those who suffer from seasickness. Going on a boat can bring on feelings of  nausea, retching, and even vomiting.

Guess what? ReliefBand® treats those nasty symptoms. That’s right, you no longer need to be the one left on the dock. It’s time to join your friends and do more than just cut bait.

Now that you have the seasickness sorted, you need to do a few other things before you start hauling in fish.

In addition to your ReliefBand® and the actual gear (rod, reel, etc.) needed to catch the fish, you’ll want a life jacket, sunscreen, food, potable water, a cooler with ice in it to pack out the fish you catch, a first aid kit, bug spray, sunglasses, and don’t forget to zip your keys into a pocket or clip them to your belt loop.

Nothing is as sad as a loaded key ring drifting out of sight beneath the water.

If you’re fishing on the boat, you may need to have a license, if legally required. These days, you can usually order one online. Be aware that, depending on what type of fish you’re going after, you may need more than one license or permit.

One other thing—anything you want to keep dry should be placed in a waterproof bag. Soggy sandwiches and runny maps are funny only when they happen to the other guy.

Do you have tips for prepping for a fishing trip? Please share them in the comments for everyone to read.

Have fun out there!

Europe In Summer

Every part of Europe calls to us — maybe it’s the history, or perhaps the romance. Whatever it is, its pull is nearly irresistible.

Those of us who suffer from motion sickness find the pull isn’t as strong given the nausea, retching, and vomiting we experience when traveling by car, plane, train, boat or even, on a bad day, an elevator.

However, it’s summer and time to get our vacay on!

Don’t let motion sickness ruin your day (or your vacay); instead, start living your life. With Reliefband® on the wrist, you control those nasty symptoms, and you’ll find travel isn’t the nausea-inducing torture it used to be.

If you’re ready to plan your visit, we have a few favorite spots to share.

Majorca is a Spanish island drenched in ancient ruins, mountains, and beach resorts. It is a land to suit nearly every preference. Pack lots of sunscreen and relax.

Corfu provides a bit of the touristy beach vibe, but primarily, it’s an island that introduces you to the slow pace of life in Greece. If you want to immerse yourself in the Greek culture, this is the perfect spot.

Scotland, the land of lochs, moors, kilt-wearing men, castles, golf courses, bagpipes, and cities and landscapes so beautiful, it melts the heart. No one ever regrets a trip to Scotland.

Really, there are a thousand spots around Europe that would delight anyone looking for a place to land for a week or two. The point is to get out there and enjoy life.

Don’t let the misery of motion sickness stop you from trying new things. Live your life in full motion!

Crazy Carnival Rides

Pic source www.pixabay.com


 

Nausea, cold sweat, even retching and vomiting—they’re all symptoms of motion sickness and they can pop up at inconvenient times, right?

 

For those of us who live with motion sickness, we know what to expect in the car or on a boat, or in an airplane.

But what about . . . at the carnival?

The teacup ride that little kids love—oof. The base of the ride goes around in a big circle, and each teacup on the base revolves independently. There’s a little wheel in the middle of each teacup that controls the spin of that cup. All it takes is one gleeful kid who’s determined to yank that wheel ‘round and ‘round, and there goes lunch!

At the Stratosphere in Las Vegas, guests can pay to be strapped into a giant teeter-totter and thrown 27 feet over the edge of the casino, left to dangle face-down 866 feet above the Strip.

A Devil’s Wheel looks simple enough. It’s a flat, slightly raised circular floor so many feet in diameter. Riders sit in the middle of the floor, which then spins faster and faster until they’re all tossed off, landing we’re not sure where but hopefully on a soft surface.

Some people won’t hop on the rides because they’re scary as all get-out. That’s really the only reason one needs.

And then there are those who love the thrill but end up puking because of, yep, motion sickness.

We can’t stop the scary. It is what it is. But, ReliefBand® helps control the nausea, retching, and vomiting associated with motion sickness. If you want to dangle over the Las Vegas Strip from atop a very tall casino, at least wear a ReliefBand® on your wrist!

 

Boating Season

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It’s boating season — time to test for leaks and spruce up the brightwork!

If you’re shaking your head because you know that you’ll be hanging over the side, losing your breakfast shortly after boarding, we hear you.

ReliefBand® on your wrist controls the nausea, retching, and vomiting of seasickness. You turn it on and adjust the power setting to fit your needs, and you’ll be buying boat shoes in no time.

This is how it works: the ReliefBand sends out gentle pulses to the median nerve on the underside of your wrist. These pulses send signals to the nausea center in your brain. Those signals then modulate the body’s natural neural pathways between the brain and stomach. This blocks the sensation of nausea.

Take control of your life, and hit the open waters. It doesn’t matter what type of boat you choose, just go! Canoes are fun (and tippy), sailboats come in all sizes and are the romantics of the sea, and powerboats can have you on top of the waves before you know it.

It doesn’t matter how big or small the boat is. What’s important is that you’re out there, having fun.

Oh, and don’t forget your sunscreen!

Tulip Time – Road Trip!

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If you’re a tulip lover, this is your time of year. Tulips are showing off all over the country, and that says “road trip” to us.

Americans have always been in love with cars and winding roads, particularly when the weather is fine. We found tulip festivals dotted around the country—hope there’s one near you.

If you live around New York, Albany hosts a Mother’s Day weekend full of tulips. This year is the 69th annual event, and they even have a Tulip Ball if you’re so inclined.

Pella, Iowa, transforms into the Netherlands for their 82nd annual Tulip Time Festival, beating out Albany by more than a decade. For three days, you can clomp around in wooden shoes, eat Dutch treats, and party like it’s 1894.

In Lehi, Utah, the fields are covered with hundreds of thousands of tulips. Once you’re “tuliped out” you can run a half marathon, go to a swing dance, listen to the Lyceum Philharmonic, and gorge on food, food, food.

The tulip festival in Skagit Valley, Washington, isn’t in one patch. It’s spread out over miles and miles, and the field locations change every year. Think of it as a festival/scavenger hunt.

Wherever you’re headed this year, pack snacks and liquids, and wear sturdy shoes for hiking over and around acres of tulips.

Oh, and if you hear “road trip” and think “carsick,” we have you covered. Slip ReliefBand® on your wrist and turn it on, then forget about the nausea, retching, and vomiting of motion sickness.

We take care of that for you, without drugs and without delay!

Say Yes To Travel, No To Motion Sickness

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Traveling adds depth and perspective to our lives. Saying yes to travel opportunities is fun!

But motion sickness, the kind some of us experience when we fly, or ride in a car or boat, can be enough to stop us from going across town—forget about going across the country (or the world).

The answer is simple: ReliefBand®. Worn on the wrist, it’s a fast, drug-free way to treat the nasty symptoms of nausea, retching, and vomiting that keep us from living life as we’d like.

Once our motion sickness is under control, the world is ours to explore. Following is a bucket list of destinations we’ve started for 2017. We invite you to add to it in the comments.

Mont St.-Michel is an old abbey off of the coast of Normandy, France. When the tide comes in, it’s an island surrounded by water, seeming to float on the sea. Once the tide is out, you can make your way there and walk the paths of monks.

Next winter, we hope to sleep on ice at the ICEHOTEL in Sweden. It’s a work of art, rebuilt every year in a few short weeks. However, we hear they’re going to attempt to keep it open year-round, with the help of solar panels to keep it cool. Either way, we can’t wait.

The Ithaa Undersea Restaurant in the Maldives is stunning. You dine under a glass dome surrounded by, yes, the sea. Stingrays and other creatures of the deep are your companions for a pricey but once-in-a-lifetime meal.

Whitehaven Beach in Australia is blindingly white. Hence the name. They say it’s 89% silica, which accounts for its color. We don’t know if that’s true, but who doesn’t want to walk on such soft, white sand?

The Arashiyama Bamboo Grove in Japan is a magical place in which to stroll. The sound of the wind making its way through the bamboo is unique and not to be missed.

Well, this is our bucket list so far. What’s on your list?

Remember, this is the year to change your life. Treat the symptoms of motion sickness, and go!

Hope to see you out there.

 

Nausea And The Bad Old Days

                                                                         pic source www.pixabay.com


 

At ReliefBand®, we’re well-versed in the treatment of nausea, retching, and vomiting related to motion and morning sickness.

We’re proud to bring our wearable technology to market—a device which provides drug-free, fast relief from the nausea, retching, and vomiting indicated above.

Because this is our world, we have an intense interest in not only what’s happening today in the area of relief of nausea and vomiting, but also in the treatment history of these symptoms.

Rachael Russell, a PhD candidate at the University of Manchester in the UK, wrote her thesis on the subject: Nausea and Vomiting: A History of Signs, Symptoms and Sickness in Nineteenth-Century Britain.

Her work is thorough and quite long (it is a thesis, after all), but we recommend it if the topic interests you.

We do want to share just a few of the fascinating bits that explain how nausea was treated back in the day, though we are not advocating for these practices. With apologies to Ms. Russell for not sharing her entire manuscript:

While Darwin tried raisins, others stuck to tea and dry biscuits. A light, bland diet was the favoured [food] option.

Brandy was a seemingly popular [alcohol] option . . . Dry champagne, sometimes iced, was also chosen to combat nausea and vomiting at sea, as it was considered able to revive energy and be retained in the stomach when everything else caused irritation. According to Dr Andrew Wilson . . . the reason for its success was its carbonic acid gas content.

Frederic Carpenter Skey (1798-1872), a surgeon at St Bartholomew’s, recommended to the sea-cadet Henry Knight (b. 1848) that he use quinine – ‘more efficient if given in port or sherry about 2 thirds of a glass.’

According to John King, a surgeon aboard a Nantucket whaler, he kept ‘ether’, a teaspoonful of which he mixed in wine for treating sea-sickness.

There were also numerous patent remedies that passengers could choose from . . . These remedies often contained alcohol, sugar and opium.

Most remedies were to be ingested and were thought to act directly on the abdomen. There were far fewer local applications, such as that patented by Pierre Molinari in 1858. Molinari claimed to prevent sea-sickness by adding to vinegar the following ingredients: rue, thyme, mint, rosemary, absinthe, turmeric, the green husks of walnuts, rocou, poppy heads and potash. Wadding was then soaked in this mixture and placed on the pit of the stomach.

In his 1857 lectures on digestion Thomas King Chambers suggested that ‘[t]he best remedy for healthy persons to take is very frothy bottled porter: if it does not in every case prevent the vomiting, yet the prostration afterwards is certainly avoided, and the ejecta are not so disagreeable.’ Chambers also recommended chloroform to prevent the violent straining during vomiting, though lamented that it would not prevent nausea.

In his text on How to Travel, for example, Thomas Knox advised his readers that: Many persons will tell you that it is an excellent thing to be sea-sick, as you are so much better for it afterwards. If you are a sufferer you will do well to accept their statements as entirely correct, since you are thereby consoled and soothed, and the malady doesn’t care what you think about it, one way or another.

Chemical formulas were rarely noted to have been successful. Creosote, an anti-emetic, was often mentioned. However, it was also criticised as, given in the wrong doses, it could make the sickness worse. James Henry Bennet argued in 1857 that chemical treatments were more commonly unsuccessful because they were expelled from the stomach before having the chance to work. He therefore suggested opium injections into the rectum. This was able to bypass the stomach and act directly on the nerves, encouraging sleep.

And with that, we draw this peek into the past to a close.

We’re grateful that science has brought us to this point! With a ReliefBand® on the wrist, we simply push a button to treat our symptoms.

Thanks to Rachael Russell for the historical perspective.